Spring Chickens

As spring arrives at the Accokeek Foundation, so too have fresh eggs, as our chickens have begun once again to lay.

These black and white Dominiques are recognized as America's first chicken breed.

Our two flocks are some of the stars of the barnyard, clucking and cooing and even controlling small pests. Indeed, our lustrous red Buckeyes—the only American breed created entirely by a woman—are vigilant in their pursuit of mice (and have even been compared to cats in this regard). Right next door lives a flock of Dominiques: black and white barred birds that are recognized as America’s first chicken breed.

The conservation of endangered livestock breeds—from our heritage chickens to our heritage hogs, sheep, and cattle—is just one small piece of the Foundation’s wider historical mission. But with fresh brown eggs in our kitchen and insects out of our barnyard, keeping chickens often seems more like fun than work.

Interested in raising poultry of your own? Sign up for our upcoming Backyard Poultry Workshop!

Saturday, March 12, 2011

9:00 a.m. to Noon

Accokeek Foundation Education Center

$40 Non-members, $35 members

This course will provide you with the information that is needed to raise your own poultry. Participants will receive a handbook and other take-home materials. Pre-registration required.

To learn more about keeping chickens in Prince George’s County, visit www.pghens.com or send an email to princegeorgeshens (at) gmail (dot) com.

Advertisements

Meet Catherine Krikstan: Our Chesapeake Conservation Corps Volunteer

Catherine Krikstan

Meet Catherine Krikstan, Accokeek Foundation's Chesapeake Conservation Corps Volunteer

The Chesapeake Conservation Corps was launched in 2010 to increase public involvement in environmental protection and bring in new participants to the field of conservation. The program will help individuals, communities, organizations, and governments become better stewards of our state’s natural resources. Sixteen watershed organizations and government agencies throughout Maryland such as the Accokeek Foundation, Alice Ferguson Foundation, the South River Federation, and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources have been provided with volunteers who will aid in environmental outreach and stewardship efforts.

We are excited to have Catherine Krikstan join our team. Starting mid-November with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps’ inaugrual kick-off ceremony, Catherine hit the ground running assisting with final preparations for the December 9th conference, Common Ground: Growing Agriculture, Restoring the Bay. This year, Catherine will work with staff to encourage agricultural and environmental stewardship, providing support to the Center for Agriculture and Environmental Stewardship (CAES) and the Ecosystem Farm. Over the course of the year, she will help to coordinate educational programs and workshops and support our public outreach and marketing efforts. She has a bachelor’s degree from St. Mary’s College of Maryland and recently earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Maryland. Her last semester of graduate school was spent covering the Chesapeake Bay for the Capital News Service, where she published stories in both local and national news outlets about struggling watermen, rising sea levels, and ever-expanding algae blooms. She has a strong interest in sustainable agriculture, and spent last summer managing her own small-scale Community Supported Agriculture program on the Eastern Shore.

Let’s all give Catherine a warm welcome and best wishes for a happy new year at the Foundation.